July 14, 2013


premiium:

i went outside once, graphics were amazing but the story line was pretty shit

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Via HEY TOOTS, TO THE STRUGGLE BUGGY

June 20, 2012


The Eyes—Five Regions of the Body and What They Can Tell You

The eyes are arguably the most significant region on our list, if predominantly for our innate ability to read them.

Based on an understanding of the regions of the brain, glances left and right and their relationship to fabrication and conversation are telling.
Eye contact, rapid eye movement, and dilation each stand to tell their own stories and are each intrinsically connected to the observed’s thread of emotions and responses.

Looking left is generally indicative of recall, while look right is associated with creating. Looking right and down signals the accessing of feelings and looking left and down indicates self–talk.

Upward glances are related to visual images, remembered on the left and created on the right, and sideways glances are related to auditory memory in the left and fabrication on the right.

An eye shrug (a short upward roll of the eyes) denotes irritation and can be easily connected to the idea of ‘looking to the heavens.’ A similar movement in the eyebrows is called the eyebrow flash and is indicative of acknowledgement if short and surprise or fear if elongated. Pupil dilation is related to attraction or desire and the widening of the eyes denotes interest and greeting.

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#Five Regions of the Body and What They Can Tell You #Sherlock #The New Sherlock Holmes #Deduction #Kinesics #Eyes #Body Language

The Mouth—Five Regions of the Body and What They Can Tell You

The mouth’s importance is derived primarily from its function in communication and its connection to infant vulnerability. The mouth is associated clearly with ‘emoting’ and its significance changes depending on what it is actively doing—reading the breathing, drinking, or eating mouth are diametrically differing experiences.

Biting lips and nails, and grinding teeth are both inward displacement responses and indicate tension, suppression, frustration or anxiety. Pen-chewing, smoking, and thumb-sucking are all examples of infant-impulses and are basic self comforting responses.

Non-genuine smiles are most common and they’re typically used to try and control a situation. Genuine smiles are identified most easily by the involvement of the eyes and, obviously, non-genuine smiles can be identified when the smile does not extend to the eyes.

Practiced smiles are often created by dropping the jaw—forcing the face into a position that creates a smile.

Pasted smiles appear quickly, usually have teeth, and last longer than the average smile. They often denote a distaste or anger in the observed and typically result from a forced agreement or placation.  They very nearly approach aggressive posturing found in animals—Think of a teenager smiling at their parents as they’re being lectured.

Pulled smiles are tight-lipped and stretch across the face, concealing the teeth. They indicate withheld or suppressed feelings or knowledge and sometimes appear as a rejection signal.

Both pulled and pasted smiles can appear in moments of intense grief, anger, or emotional turmoil and both can be accompanied by forced laughter; a sign of stress or attempts to change the atmosphere, signal cooperation with another, or maintain a sense of empathy.

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#I have a lot to say about the mouth. #Five Regions of the Body and What They Can Tell You #Deduction #Mouth #Sherlock #The New Sherlock Holmes #Kinesics #Body Language

The Head—Five Regions of the Body and What They Can Tell You

The head, as it serves to lead and determine the body’s position, is vital to both defensive and directional body language.The movement of the head in conversation is used, both consciously and unconsciously, to cue.

The head ties in a lot with the hands. Covering integral parts of the head is often an act of suppression—whether it’s outside information (the ears and eyes) or internal urges (the mouth.)

Touching or scratching the nose when speaking is indicative of lying or exaggeration while pinching or touching the nose while listening is typically indicative of suppressing or delaying responses—an extended pinch to the bridge of the nose is a severe form of this, and indicates an adverse response, irritation, or rejection.

Parts of the head are used for self soothing, and soft touching of the lips or tugging of the ears are denotative of such. The way the head is held should always be noted as it serves to describe the observed’s perceived social position or that which they wish to be perceived as.

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#Five Regions of the Body and What They Can Tell You #The Head #Sherlock #The New Sherlock Holmes #Deduction #Kinesics

The Upper Body—Five Regions of the Body and What They Can Tell You

The upper body’s significance is founded in two parts: the hands and the arms.  The arms function as barriers for the body and indicate defensiveness or openness depending on position; The hand’s function as a near direct outlet of thoughts and their movements, intentional or subconscious, have extensive meaning.

Just like the legs, crossed and ‘closed’ arms indicate defensiveness or nervousness in the observed. In the arms, however, we’re introduced to the use of outside objects.

The use of a bag, papers, books, or anything of the kind to cover the chest indicates discomfort and defense. Contrarily, while a front cross or clasp of the arms indicates distress or disquiet, clasping the arms behind the body indicates power and confidence and evokes a sense of authority.

The Hands are used in the majority of conscious social signals—hand jabs for emphasis, sizing items up or drawing in the air for illustration, and physical language like the middle finger and the peace or victory sign. A person often uses their hands to try and control a conversation, whether to placate (open and up) or to dominate (slashing or chopping in the air).

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#Five Regions of the Body and What They Can Tell You #The Upper Body #Deduction #Sherlock #The New Sherlock Holmes #Kinesics

June 19, 2012


The Legs and Feet—Five Regions of the Body and What They Can Tell You

The lower body can function as a strong mirror into the confidence and perceived social position of the observed. It also, I believe, is one of the most wildly underestimated tools in an observer’s arsenal.

Because the lower body is not as easily consciously controlled, the signals gained can serve to validate or devalue other expressions and micro-expressions of the observed. When reading lower body signals modesty (inflicted by age, gender roles, and the like) and comfort (clothing types, sex, time spent in any one position) need to be taken into account in your analysis.

Your first focus should be the legs direction; Watch the knee. A seated person directs their knee towards the focus of their interest—a person in conversation whose knees are directed away from someone or something indicates a disinterest or discomfort with the person, the situation, or the conversation.

Leg position, while varied, is simple to understand. The set of the legs is read in relation to the use of the limbs in protective posturing, much in the way of the arms. ‘Closed’ legs often indicate disinterest, caution, or a sense of propriety. ‘Open’* legs indicate confidence, involvement, or arrogance.

Body language should always be read in context. Your skill is lost if you cant assay a situation–if you’re stupid, sexual posturing could easily be read as disinterest (twining) or aggression (open, leg splay) and suddenly you’re misreading an affair as a rivalry. 

*The ‘American’ or ‘Figure-4’ cross is counted among open leg positions for obvious reasons. 

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#Five Regions of the Body and What They Can Tell You #Legs and Feet #Sherlock Holmes #The New Sherlock Holmes

June 17, 2012


Have you ever been invited to Mensa International?
Anonymous

Yes, actually—Mensa’s minimum standard isn’t particularly high. If you’re looking for a ballpark, I can throw you one; technically I’m eligible to join the Prometheus society. 

The real question is whether these things mean anything. And the easy answer is no. It’s my experience that these groups are primarily housed by stuffy fat old men whose main motivation to join is to somehow elevate themselves from the masses.

Not my kind of crowd. I’d rather work with innovators than with people who think a number simply proves their worth (their ‘intelligence’) and subsequently do nothing of worth. Decidedly dull.

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June 13, 2012


Remember the OCS/Heart Transplant post? Imageshack didn’t approve.

After returning from my hiatus from the blog, it came to my attention that one of my (few) posts was displaying a nasty 403 error where an image ought to be. It had apparently been pulled for violating the ToS, meaning either the site’d done a sweep and zeroed in on it, or some outstanding Samaritan had taken it upon themselves to report it. My problem, though: the image broke no rules. 

I’m going to traipse on out on the proverbial limb here and say that some squeamish civ saw the image here, browsing tumblr, or shuffling through milesian’s* responses and on a knee-jerk moment of ‘ew' decided to report the image back to the website (which, notably, would take a lot more time than merely scrolling down or navigating away.) 

I sent a complaint ImageShacks way and reuploaded the image so my content would not be compromised. 

An image I uploaded for use on my blog was pulled and deleted apparently due to the content being inappropriate or reported as Harassment. The image contained photos related to heart transplants and was being used to explain and educate on the medical practice of heart transplantation and the variations therein. There was nothing inappropriate about the image, nor was it being used to harass the squeamish, and in no way could the image be construed as pornographic; The image was for academic consumption and its removal was uncalled for. 

Because I have reread the ImageShack’s ToS and am positive that I am in full accordance with the rules, I’ve reuploaded the image. I hope it will not be deleted again, because otherwise I will need to move to another image host as I will continue to upload similar content as the medical and crime fields are a central focus of my work.

—AP

My hope is that ImageShack will respond fairly, or at least let the matter drop entirely. It is too often that useful information, and things that can indeed be perceived as beautiful, are censored under false pretenses.

For some reason the squeamish do an awfully good job of ‘protecting’ the masses from medical and other educational and interesting content under the idea that such things shouldn’t be easily accessible for public consumption. That’s ridiculous. A trigger warning should suffice and the squeamish should be responsible to curate what they see, rather than the mass limiting of everyone’s view.

Tumblr does a fantastic job at being a supportive and non-judgemental content hoster for millions, and I hope that other websites will follow suit. Censorship, executed responsibly, is not meant to keep people from seeing things some may not want to see, but to protect the majority from content that is universally considered distasteful and wrong. Which, looked at logically, seems something awkward and difficult to define, because what we normally associate with censorship (porn, swearing, political radicals) does not always fall safely into those definitions. It’s time people understand the rating and reporting systems of the websites they use and begin to utilize them correctly, and it’s time websites stand by their rules and remember that upholding them only means something if those are actually the rules. I don’t read ToS to find out later that there’re some arcane hidden rules on triggering and subjectively ‘gross’ content. Let’s all work on being a bit more responsible. Or at least not assholes—

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#trigger warning #wrong!

TNSH is going through an overhaul, the first phase of which has been completed—focusing mainly on the aesthetic of the blog. Now that this peripheral nonsense is all classed up, posts are going to become more regular with a focus on case work and experiments. 

'The New Sherlock Holmes' is back.

–AS

(Source: thenewsherlockholmes)

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#Sherlock Holmes #Announcement

The outline for a report I’m drafting. The black bars cover secrets.

The outline for a report I’m drafting. The black bars cover secrets.

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#in this case secrets mean awkward phrasing #reports #Sherlock Holmes

March 11, 2012


milesian:

A donor heart beating in a mechanical system which keeps it warm, oxygenated, with nutrient enriched blood pumping through.
(Thanks to Ceci and Shay who helped me with this.)

Gorgeous. 
Organ Care System, I’d venture, or something similar; a machine that allows for what’s called a ‘living organ’ transplant. A procedure that, rather than cooling, keeps the heart warmed at body temperature and, through the OCS, allows it to pump oxygenated blood. Keeps a potential transplant viable much longer.
HOW TO RECOGNIZE A HEART TRANSPLANT
Heart transplants are lovely, really. Heterotropic procedures make for stunning corpses; the transplant is arranged in such a way that both chambers and blood vessels connect to form a double heart. Hints at a weak donor heart, pulmonary hypertension in the patient, or a marked donor/patient size differential.  
I doubt that’s where this beauty is headed, though. Straight for standard Orthotopic — what you’d figure when someone said heart transplant. The donor heart is trimmed to fit into the remaining left atrium of the patient’s, and it’s all patched up with some sutures to the ‘great vessels.’ 
Which will leave some great markers for the wandering eye. The surgery leaves obvious puckering at the vessel connections, not to mention the sutures themselves, in either great or small amounts. The surgery involves a standard Median sternotomy with a vertical incision along the sternum. That itself leaves a pretty recognizable scar upon the chest.

There you have it. Frustratingly couldn’t find any resources when I googled ‘how to recognize a heart transplant in a corpse’, so here are the basics. Expand later, with notes on failed transplants and the markings of rejected hearts, as well as more on the scaring and bruising of the surgery, once I have a chance for continued research and in-depth observation. At some point I’ll touch on the tells of a person living post-transplant, though those are rather obvious. AP

milesian:

A donor heart beating in a mechanical system which keeps it warm, oxygenated, with nutrient enriched blood pumping through.

(Thanks to Ceci and Shay who helped me with this.)

Gorgeous.

Organ Care System, I’d venture, or something similar; a machine that allows for what’s called a ‘living organ’ transplant. A procedure that, rather than cooling, keeps the heart warmed at body temperature and, through the OCS, allows it to pump oxygenated blood. Keeps a potential transplant viable much longer.

HOW TO RECOGNIZE A HEART TRANSPLANT

Heart transplants are lovely, really. Heterotropic procedures make for stunning corpses; the transplant is arranged in such a way that both chambers and blood vessels connect to form a double heart. Hints at a weak donor heart, pulmonary hypertension in the patient, or a marked donor/patient size differential.  

I doubt that’s where this beauty is headed, though. Straight for standard Orthotopic — what you’d figure when someone said heart transplant. The donor heart is trimmed to fit into the remaining left atrium of the patient’s, and it’s all patched up with some sutures to the ‘great vessels.’ 

Which will leave some great markers for the wandering eye. The surgery leaves obvious puckering at the vessel connections, not to mention the sutures themselves, in either great or small amounts. The surgery involves a standard Median sternotomy with a vertical incision along the sternum. That itself leaves a pretty recognizable scar upon the chest.

Sternum Scars and Heart Sutures

There you have it. Frustratingly couldn’t find any resources when I googled ‘how to recognize a heart transplant in a corpse’, so here are the basics. Expand later, with notes on failed transplants and the markings of rejected hearts, as well as more on the scaring and bruising of the surgery, once I have a chance for continued research and in-depth observation. At some point I’ll touch on the tells of a person living post-transplant, though those are rather obvious.
AP

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#Heart #Medical #Physiology #Science #Sherlock Holmes #Surgery #Trigger Warning

February 4, 2012


You’re in a desert, walking along in the sand, when all of a sudden you look down—

Bladerunner (1982)

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#quotes #Bladerunner #Sherlock Holmes